Author Topic: Hints and tips  (Read 2757 times)

Terrywerm

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Re: Hints and tips
« Reply #15 on: February 17, 2019, 08:27:44 PM »

Here are some tips if you plan to make a set of transposing gears for your lathe so that you can cut metric threads with an imperial lead screw.


The most accurate set of transposing gears is a 100 tooth gear and a 127 tooth gear. Making the 100 tooth gear is easy, but making the 127 cannot be done with any kind of standard or custom indexing plate in the usual manner. But it can be done as follows if you are using a rotary table with a 90:1 ratio for your indexing. You will need to first make a custom indexing plate with one line that has 62 holes in it. Use that 62 hole plate to make the 127 tooth gear as follows: Cut the first tooth, then advance the gear blank 44 holes each tooth EXCEPT that you only move 43 holes every 16th tooth. Thus you advance only 43 holes on the following teeth: 16, 32, 48, 64, 80, 96, 112, and 127. Actually you will not need to advance after tooth 127, but if you perform the cut in multiple passes, you will need to do so. The incurred error is so slight that no one will ever notice, even if measuring the teeth on the 127 tooth gear.


There are two other gear pairs that will work as transposing gears, and they are much easier to make, although they have a slightly larger error showing up in the resulting metric threads. Once again, the error is very, very slight and only shows up over a long distance. If you do not plan to cut metric lead screws, the following gear pairs should work just fine, and all can be cut with the standard indexing plates that come with a 90:1 rotary table:   63 and 80    or    37 and 47       I don't have the amount of error numbers handy, but they are very minor and much work can be saved by making one of these smaller pairs of transposing gears. Additionally, the smaller sets are more likely to fit behind the safety cover over your change gear train on your lathe.
Terry

Making chips with old machines!

chips and more

Re: Hints and tips
« Reply #16 on: February 18, 2019, 09:26:39 AM »
I have also made lathes cut metric threads with an inch lead screw. I have a dividing head with stepper motor and controlled with an Arduino. With this set-up cutting any gear tooth count is very easy. The hard part is getting my brain to go through the motions! Repetitive cutting of 127 teeth, all with the same hand-eye over and over again! And then for another 15 gears with various tooth counts. After I was done and only one screw-up from a brain freeze, I was ready for a straight jacket and the looney farm. And then when I was all done and installing and playing with the gears on the lathe, I noticed that the larger gears for metric would fit but not with any room for anything else. So I played with the numbers and found a combo with smaller gears that would work and only a 0.0001” error in 1”. I can live with that!

4GSR

Re: Hints and tips
« Reply #17 on: February 18, 2019, 09:43:05 AM »
I bought a printed 37/47 gear for my SBL a while back.  Haven't tried it yet.  Thought about getting a hold of the guy and see what he would charge to make 100/127 tooth gear for me.  Then I would have to come up with the rest of the gears! Yuck!  Most of them I have from the loose change gears that came with my lathe originally.  There's a couple that would have to be made.   
Ken

chips and more

Re: Hints and tips
« Reply #18 on: February 18, 2019, 10:15:56 AM »
With the last metric thread option thing from an inch lathe that I did. I’m not sure I would do it again that way. I would look into buying another lathe with metric/inch capabilities. Or just a lathe that cuts metric threads. The cost of the lathe versus all the gear/banjo nonsense and the math is a wash. I think we could all justify another lathe. My problem would be the room for another lathe…Dave
« Last Edit: February 18, 2019, 10:17:48 AM by chips and more »

Terrywerm

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Re: Hints and tips
« Reply #19 on: February 19, 2019, 06:30:50 PM »

As much as going out and buying another lathe sounds great, most of us are in no financial position to do so, or don't have the room for another one. Not to mention that it's pretty difficult to justify the cost of a second lathe just to be able to cut an occasional metric thread. Now if a guy was cutting lots of metric threads, things would be different. Last but not least, those of us that like the 'old iron' have a little difficulty finding lathes that are capable of both.


Just my viewpoint, not attacking yours.



Terry

Making chips with old machines!

f350ca

Re: Hints and tips
« Reply #20 on: February 19, 2019, 08:10:13 PM »
Need to make the change gears for the Hardinge some day. The Summit will cut metric but the half nuts on it are really stiff so I end up running slow and stopping the spindle at the end of the thread, then reversing back to the start. Works but a pain when the Hardinge threads so nice.

Greg

woodchucker

Re: Hints and tips
« Reply #21 on: September 15, 2019, 06:09:13 PM »
SHOP VAC improvement


The floor piece was always sticking to the rubber mats, and not really picking up much.
I drilled holes, it improved it, then I cut the front middle out, and it's so much better.


Gonna do this to the 2 1/4 units as well.
Jeff
Clausing 8520   SB Model 9a - power hacksaw, Milwaukee band saw in a table.  Delta Rockwell Surface Grinder (not online yet .. being rebuilt where am I going to stick this)
For pics: https://imgur.com/user/woodchucker/posts

Carpenter84

Re: Hints and tips
« Reply #22 on: September 15, 2019, 06:16:15 PM »
I found just cutting serrations in the bottom kept it from grabbing the floor and also helped suck up the bits that just got swept infront/behind the attachment.
Shawn

First 9x42 column mill,
Enterprise 10x28 lathe,
Ko Lee 6x12 surface grinder,
Airco dip/stick 160 welder,
Fully stocked wood shop.

woodchucker

Re: Hints and tips
« Reply #23 on: September 15, 2019, 06:36:53 PM »
tried that but it kept grabbing on some surfaces and didn't let everything in.. some strands were forming in the comb. Also the really wide open front allows the full airstream, and allows debris to just enter without obstruction.....

Jeff
Clausing 8520   SB Model 9a - power hacksaw, Milwaukee band saw in a table.  Delta Rockwell Surface Grinder (not online yet .. being rebuilt where am I going to stick this)
For pics: https://imgur.com/user/woodchucker/posts

Carpenter84

Re: Hints and tips
« Reply #24 on: September 15, 2019, 07:19:03 PM »
Sorry, i should have clarified my serrations are like 1/4”x1/4”. But whatever works.
Shawn

First 9x42 column mill,
Enterprise 10x28 lathe,
Ko Lee 6x12 surface grinder,
Airco dip/stick 160 welder,
Fully stocked wood shop.

woodchucker

Re: Hints and tips
« Reply #25 on: October 27, 2019, 12:43:32 PM »
Got a new tip.
My basement wall started leaking again in a new spot. Too much hydraulic pressure I guess plus a bad I beam install left it cracked at that spot.


Anyway, I had to use my multi tool to cut the sheetrock out where I suspected the crack. The damn allen key holder was from a different tool and it just kept dropping the slick chromed allen.  I finally got annoyed enough, to fix the problem.
A simple O-RING.
It's working.
Jeff
Clausing 8520   SB Model 9a - power hacksaw, Milwaukee band saw in a table.  Delta Rockwell Surface Grinder (not online yet .. being rebuilt where am I going to stick this)
For pics: https://imgur.com/user/woodchucker/posts

woodchucker

Re: Hints and tips
« Reply #26 on: September 02, 2020, 10:40:23 AM »
New tip...
not machining, but may help you none the less.


the last four or five tubes of caulking, glue, epoxy, silicone that I put in my 2 caulking guns exploded out the back.
causing me to clean the gun fully. One gun is manual, and the other is electric. They are both hard to clean. My manual one is a good cast handle, not sheet metal..


So, what's happening? I don't know. But I did figure out a way to stop this cleaning nonsense.


Take a dog poop bag, or newspaper bag, tape the opening to the bottom of the tube.., let out all the air in the process. push the very end into the tube so the plunger will sit on that first.. stick you fingers in to hold it, then furl all the rest around the entrance to the tube, place in the gun.. if it explodes out the back, the goop will be in the bag and make cleanup either not necessary, or much easier if the bag gets a hole in it.


 
not a perfect solution, not easy to stuff, so just let it flow if it won't, it's pushing against the front so the bag should drag in...if not, you only lost a few minutes.


now, wth is wrong with many of the new tubes... Even some epoxy tubes that were really expensive..
Jeff
Clausing 8520   SB Model 9a - power hacksaw, Milwaukee band saw in a table.  Delta Rockwell Surface Grinder (not online yet .. being rebuilt where am I going to stick this)
For pics: https://imgur.com/user/woodchucker/posts