Author Topic: Truck Problem  (Read 696 times)

Bill Gruby

Truck Problem
« on: February 09, 2019, 05:21:47 PM »
 We have a  Chevy Silverado 2500 . With no one in or near the truck thee brake lights come on for about 19 seconds. No warning, no nothing. I saw it tonight while sitting at the computer and watching out the front window. Any ideas?????

 "Billy G"
Don't sweat getting old, you'll still do dumb shit, just slower.

An Optimist will tell you the glass is half full, the pessimist half empty, the engineer will say the glass is twice as big as it needs to be.

Carpenter84

Re: Truck Problem
« Reply #1 on: February 09, 2019, 05:26:43 PM »
Only the brake lights?
Any blinking?
What's the year?
Are you sitting on the key fob?
Shawn

First 9x42 column mill,
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34_40

Re: Truck Problem
« Reply #2 on: February 09, 2019, 05:38:32 PM »
Is it equipped with an alarm?
Clausing 108, Clausing 8520, Atlas Horizontal, Lincoln stick and mig welders

woodchucker

Re: Truck Problem
« Reply #3 on: February 09, 2019, 05:56:27 PM »
Could the switch for the brake light be set on the cusp of on and off. I'll bet if someone follows you it will be on quite a bit.
if it is, just get under the dash, and adjust the switch... 2 nuts adjust when it comes on and off.. Just my thought.  Temperature changes would then affect it if it is on the cusp.
Jeff
Clausing 8520   SB Model 9a - power hacksaw, Milwaukee band saw in a table.  Delta Rockwell Surface Grinder (not online yet .. being rebuilt where am I going to stick this)
For pics: https://imgur.com/user/woodchucker/posts

Bill Gruby

Re: Truck Problem
« Reply #4 on: February 09, 2019, 06:24:39 PM »
 Yup. it's the brake switch. Needs a new one. Will change tomorrow. Thanks all.

 "Billy G"
Don't sweat getting old, you'll still do dumb shit, just slower.

An Optimist will tell you the glass is half full, the pessimist half empty, the engineer will say the glass is twice as big as it needs to be.

f350ca

Re: Truck Problem
« Reply #5 on: February 09, 2019, 06:52:02 PM »
At least its a switch, new vehicles have WAY to much computer control. Last week my 17 F150 wouldn't even try to start over at my buddies. Showed warnings about "power steering assist", "hill start assist", something about lights dimming and an audio warning came over the radio that it couldn't connect my phone to 911, not a click or anything from the starter. Tried disconnecting the battery to reset the computer, same thing, hocked up a booster pack, nothing. Called roadside assistance to haul it to Ford, was going to be about an hour, so my buddy was going to drive me home. Thought we'd try it and it fired right up. Took it to the dealer, yah they could see the codes but no idea why they came up.
Gives you a warm fuzzy feeling.

Greg

grumpygator

Re: Truck Problem
« Reply #6 on: February 09, 2019, 07:26:40 PM »
That's why I stick with the old iron. No computer no sensors just your basic turn the key and go.
  I got a car in the yard right now that's throwing bogus fault codes. {Codes that do not exist} I can get the motor to run perfect but the onboard control module has a fit and tries to shut it down.
  What a waste, they finally make a motor bulletproof and they tie an ECM to it that would not run a go-kart.
    **G**

woodchucker

Re: Truck Problem
« Reply #7 on: February 09, 2019, 07:46:02 PM »
That's why I stick with the old iron. No computer no sensors just your basic turn the key and go.
  I got a car in the yard right now that's throwing bogus fault codes. {Codes that do not exist} I can get the motor to run perfect but the onboard control module has a fit and tries to shut it down.
  What a waste, they finally make a motor bulletproof and they tie an ECM to it that would not run a go-kart.
    **G**


What a waste, they finally make a motor bulletproof and they tie an ECM to it that would not run a go-kart.  ??? ?? They made a bulletproof motor? How'd they do that... because of the ECM? LOL.. that's what makes it bulletproof.  it won't let you downshift an auto tranny if your going to fast.. so now you can't use the motor for braking. It won't let  you Start it because it's too cold...   Yep bulletproof...  ;D :o ??? :'(


I wish someone would figure out why my url links or in this case a response goes to the micro font.
« Last Edit: February 10, 2019, 10:43:44 AM by woodchucker »
Jeff
Clausing 8520   SB Model 9a - power hacksaw, Milwaukee band saw in a table.  Delta Rockwell Surface Grinder (not online yet .. being rebuilt where am I going to stick this)
For pics: https://imgur.com/user/woodchucker/posts

Terrywerm

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Re: Truck Problem
« Reply #8 on: February 10, 2019, 10:15:42 AM »
I still love the old engines that need only a single wire in order to run - power to the coil. Points might be a pain to adjust, but you can almost ALWAYS get them to run. Better yet, the old magneto engines don't need any 'outside assistance' to make the world go around.
Terry

Making chips with old machines!

jpigg55

Re: Truck Problem
« Reply #9 on: February 10, 2019, 11:12:58 AM »
This is one of the things I like about “Open Source Electronics”. There are people out there who are designing, coding, and building their own ECM’s.
I’m old enough to have owned and driven automobiles that had nothing more than a coil, rotor, points, & condenser that comprised all the electrical item of the ignition system. A few cheap and readily available part and a select number of tools and you could get a vehicle back running along side the road if you had to.
I do believe that the onboard computer, sensors, and electronic ignition have done wonders to improve engine reliability, longevity, and fuel economy.
That said, if car companies would quit taking the cheapest path, a lot of these issues wouldn’t keep driving us crazy. For example, I have a 2011 Subaru Legacy. A few years ago on my way home from work, the cruise control shut down and a bunch of dashboard lights started flashing. I couldn’t tell what happened, but was able to limp it home. Turned out the torque converter lock-up solenoid had went bad.
It took my mechanic a couple days of going through a bunch of garbage fault codes stored in the ECM and looking them up to figure out what the issue even was. This is when I also found out that auto manufacturers program the computer to disable everything that is associated with a fault whether it’s bad or not. In my instance as I understand it, my car ECM read the lock-up solenoid failure and a fault with the transmission and started shutting down or put into “Safe Mode” anything that used an input from the transmission sensors.
Another issue I see coming is the inability to use cheaper aftermarket parts. Another co-worker friend of mine had the throttle-body sensor go out in his car. Not only did this leave him stranded and required a tow, the OEM replacement part from Ford was $600 because you couldn’t just replace the sensor, you had to replace the whole throttle-body.
He found an aftermarket throttle-body for $400, but the computer on the car wouldn’t accept it because it didn’t have the Ford code on it. His mechanic told him the only way to make it work was to take it to a Ford dealership and see if they would reprogram it so it would work. I can’t imagine what they would charge to do that even if they were willing to.
SB 9A, Clausing 8520, Sanford MG 612

34_40

Re: Truck Problem
« Reply #10 on: February 11, 2019, 08:08:26 PM »
It's going to get worse yet.  Just like Caterpiller and John Deere, the big 3 are already pushing that "they own" the technology in that car and since the government makes them liable to meet the emission standards, you as the vehicle owner will be locked out from performing repairs.  Only a dealer will be allowed to service engine / trans / computer controls.  At most you can change the oil if they get their way. 

Mass has defeated the attempt twice.

The big 3 do not want to share the info with repair manual companies even!
Clausing 108, Clausing 8520, Atlas Horizontal, Lincoln stick and mig welders

grumpygator

Re: Truck Problem
« Reply #11 on: February 12, 2019, 12:14:18 AM »
'Fraid I'm going to disagree about the ECM making it Bulletproof. It's the advancements in metallurgy and closer tolerances that make the newer motors better. Most every problem that comes my way is a sensor or the wiring to it that causes the problem. It's the bean counters that go for the cheapest parts. If they can save 200.00$ a car times the whole production run then everyone but the end user is happy.
 Example When wheel bearings went out for 50.00$ you could replace them all. Not anymore. You have to replace the whole hub because of a sensor. And one of my favorites lets put the water pump behind the timing chain on front wheel drive cars. Any leak goes straight to the oil pan. Oh and then there is the electric fuel pump inside the gas tank with no way to access it except to drop the tank.
 To sum it all up I don't need an idiot proof car since I'm not an idiot. I do not need a computer to second guess me or be in charge. I'll stick with my old cars and trucks. I'll still stop and ask you if you need a hand when you are broke down on the side of the road because your new car left you stranded, but on the ride to the next town don't get mad if I chuckle and make fun at you for buying a 60,000$ car or truck that can't get you home.
    **G**

Terrywerm

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Re: Truck Problem
« Reply #12 on: February 12, 2019, 12:43:23 AM »
I've been tempted to go back to horse and buggy...  :o
Terry

Making chips with old machines!

jpigg55

Re: Truck Problem
« Reply #13 on: February 12, 2019, 08:39:02 AM »
I didn't mean to imply that the ECM made them bulletproof. Metallurgy and tolerances more than likely made a difference in longevity as well.
I do remember a time when most people wouldn't even take a second look at a vehicle if it had near or over 100,000 miles on the odometer, even if well maintained.
I totally agree about the Federally mandated "SAFTY" features like Tire Pressure Sensors. I used to have all the valve stems replaced when I put new tires on. Now with TPS, a $0.30 valve stem costs $15 and good luck finding anyone with the ability to program the new sensor to the computer except authorized dealers which will cost you 3 times as much or more for the same service.

I also wouldn't doubt that auto manufacturers don't want to share information much like agricultural equipment manufacturers. Even today it's near impossible to find a repair or parts manual for even old tractors online. Unless you have access to one, you have to pay them $300 or more to order one.
I say if they want it that way, then let them have it, but along with that, if you pay your mechanics $15/hr then that's all you can charge me. A part costs you $10, then the most you can charge me is $10.25 for it. I bet if something like that was tagged on they wouldn't want it so much.
You can bet they will spend whatever it takes to pay off anyone to ensure that never happens.
SB 9A, Clausing 8520, Sanford MG 612

chips and more

Re: Truck Problem
« Reply #14 on: February 12, 2019, 09:03:30 AM »
My wife has a BMW. I can take a wrench to it, no problem. But when It has a computer problem, I’m almost dead in the water. Like said, the good old days when cars had simple engineering. Nowadays, when I pop the hood, it’s hard telling what the hell half of the stuff is? And it’s hard to see anything with all the shroud crap all over the engine. And tinkering with the all-electric cars, forget it! You could die messing around with it. That high voltage DC can kill you!