Author Topic: Still scratching my head on this one.  (Read 78 times)

grumpygator

Still scratching my head on this one.
« on: May 12, 2019, 10:22:15 PM »
I understand induction but, why would that wheel move when an Al plate passed over it if there were no impurities in it.
 And if this works why can't you use an Al pan on an induction cooktop?
  More input needed for this simple mind.
   https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Ua6brgZha-4
   **G**

Terrywerm

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Re: Still scratching my head on this one.
« Reply #1 on: May 12, 2019, 11:06:04 PM »
Induction anything is kind of a strange bird and I don't get it all either. Someone with more knowledge than myself will need to step up to the microphone for this one.
Terry

Making chips with old machines!

4GSR

Re: Still scratching my head on this one.
« Reply #2 on: May 13, 2019, 07:52:06 AM »
It's a form of Eddy current that affects any non-ferrous materials by inducing current into the metal and heating it up.  As long as you don't touch the coil, you can pass your hand across the coil and not feel a thing unless you have metal in you.  No different that a CT scan or MRI scan, they both operate of eddy currents in creating images. 
Ken

woodchucker

Re: Still scratching my head on this one.
« Reply #3 on: May 13, 2019, 08:56:48 AM »
It's a form of Eddy current that affects any non-ferrous materials by inducing current into the metal and heating it up.  As long as you don't touch the coil, you can pass your hand across the coil and not feel a thing unless you have metal in you.  No different that a CT scan or MRI scan, they both operate of eddy currents in creating images.


Stick a large neod magnet inside a copper tube, and it will drop slowly. Yet, the copper is not attracted to the magnet. Same difference. The metal is part of the magnet flux as far as I can tell. But I don't fully grasp either.
Jeff
Clausing 8520   SB Model 9a - power hacksaw, Milwaukee band saw in a table.  Delta Rockwell Surface Grinder (not online yet .. being rebuilt where am I going to stick this)
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Carpenter84

Re: Still scratching my head on this one.
« Reply #4 on: May 13, 2019, 10:08:13 AM »
"magic pixies" - AvE
"Magnets. How the hell do they work?" - Insane Clown Posse.







It all had to do with the movement of electrons which exist in everything that has mass - including non-ferrous materials. As the magnet passes by an object, it excites the elections in the material. The electrons vibrate. The faster and more frequent the magnets pass the object the faster the electrons vibrate, the more heat they create.

The more efficient the electrons can pass through the material, the more heat they will create. If the electrons can travel through the material, you can create a charge within the material. That charge interacts with the magnets creating and magnetic field. (magnet down a copper tube)

Or so I understand it.


Edit. ElectroBoom explains it much better...

https://youtu.be/u7Rg0TcHQ4Y
« Last Edit: May 13, 2019, 10:11:03 AM by Carpenter84 »
Shawn

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RayH

Re: Still scratching my head on this one.
« Reply #5 on: May 13, 2019, 10:45:40 AM »
Any conductive material moving through a magnetic field will have an electrical charge induced. The charge creates a magnetic field around the conductive material and the two magnetic fields interact.
Ray