Author Topic: Restoring a vise  (Read 256 times)

Carpenter84

Restoring a vise
« on: August 15, 2019, 10:48:28 PM »
I grabbed a very rusty, seized up vise from the depths of the farmhouse where my new shop is...
I bought some evapo-rust. Man, stuff works incredibly...
I filed some hammer peened surfaces to get the movable jaw to move properly. But, the jaws... one is missing, but Iím not actually sure how theyíre affixed. Iíd like to replace them with copper jaws.

Itís a RAE 104. 4Ē jaw.

Thoughts?
Shawn

First 9x42 column mill,
Enterprise 10x28 lathe,
Ko Lee 6x12 surface grinder,
Airco dip/stick 160 welder,
Fully stocked wood shop.

Carpenter84

Re: Restoring a vise
« Reply #1 on: August 15, 2019, 10:52:07 PM »
Well... that wasnít difficult to find...

Securely welded...? Sweat on, maybe?
Shawn

First 9x42 column mill,
Enterprise 10x28 lathe,
Ko Lee 6x12 surface grinder,
Airco dip/stick 160 welder,
Fully stocked wood shop.

4GSR

Re: Restoring a vise
« Reply #2 on: August 16, 2019, 08:20:08 AM »
Just amazes me how some body, BUBBA, that is, can abuse and literally destroy a bench vise!  And that is no dinky vise either.   Go look at Abom79 and Mr. Pete 222 at some of their vise restorations.  Some of the jaw inserts are held in with pins and others with screws.  I can't imagine some one brazing them in place.
Ken

Carpenter84

Re: Restoring a vise
« Reply #3 on: August 16, 2019, 08:58:52 AM »
No pins, no screws. Apparently, securely welded in place. But I see now weld beads. So, I assume maybe brazed. 
Shawn

First 9x42 column mill,
Enterprise 10x28 lathe,
Ko Lee 6x12 surface grinder,
Airco dip/stick 160 welder,
Fully stocked wood shop.

woodchucker

Re: Restoring a vise
« Reply #4 on: August 16, 2019, 09:50:45 AM »
I would not go the weld or braze route.
get someone or youself if you have oxy/act to braze the missing areas.
Then make some jaws, make hard, make soft.
Drill the jaws, then transfer to the face of the vise, and drill and thread.
I don't like the coarse jaws. My Charles Parker has smoother jaws, and I have a set of Wilton(I think) copper overlays.
My jaws don't come out w/out a lot of work. They are pinned.


that's what I would do. Hard jaws come in handy. Also you  might make a set of V jaws, going both vertical and horizontal... It never hurts to have options.
https://imgur.com/a/fN9N0
« Last Edit: August 16, 2019, 09:52:48 AM by woodchucker »
Jeff
Clausing 8520   SB Model 9a - power hacksaw, Milwaukee band saw in a table.  Delta Rockwell Surface Grinder (not online yet .. being rebuilt where am I going to stick this)
For pics: https://imgur.com/user/woodchucker/posts

chips and more

Re: Restoring a vise
« Reply #5 on: August 16, 2019, 10:41:31 AM »
Itís a nice vise, but not a bullet! And after all the work, maybe spent gas, other materials and shop time. When done, it will still not be a bullet vise. Unless it has sentimental value? IMHO I would move on. Iím no young chicken. Been there and done that!!!!! Iím just trying to prevent someone else from making the same mistakes that I did in my younger years when I fixed everything when I should have been moving on! If you are going to be a bear, be a grizzly! And have a hobby shop to be proud of with all the best you could have found in your travels! Set your sights high!
« Last Edit: August 16, 2019, 10:49:05 AM by chips and more »

Carpenter84

Re: Restoring a vise
« Reply #6 on: August 16, 2019, 11:45:39 AM »
My referring to the welded jaws was to inquire how you guys thought that remaining jaw was affixed. I want to remove it. I will make copper jaws.
The vise is perfectly fine. I did some light filing on the slide to knock down some mushroomed areas and the vise slid right together. Smooth with minimal play.

I will restore this vise as it's leaps better than the 8" princess auto chunk of Chinese cast iron that's bolted to my bench currently. It has so much play that I have to push the movable jaw over as I tighten to make sure it closes aligned.
Shawn

First 9x42 column mill,
Enterprise 10x28 lathe,
Ko Lee 6x12 surface grinder,
Airco dip/stick 160 welder,
Fully stocked wood shop.

Carpenter84

Re: Restoring a vise
« Reply #7 on: August 16, 2019, 11:47:25 AM »
And,
Now that you mention brazing, I might braze up some of the peen pits and those broken corners, mill the jaw pockets smooth and pretty.

No, it's not a bullet... But I found it for free. I'm not going to complain. It's still a nicer vise than the one I have.
Shawn

First 9x42 column mill,
Enterprise 10x28 lathe,
Ko Lee 6x12 surface grinder,
Airco dip/stick 160 welder,
Fully stocked wood shop.

4GSR

Re: Restoring a vise
« Reply #8 on: August 16, 2019, 01:01:44 PM »
There's a very good chance that the original jaws were held in place by screws/pins.  Just can't imagine the jaws welded or soldered in place.  Like woodchucker said, nice to change out the jaws when needed.
Ken

f350ca

Re: Restoring a vise
« Reply #9 on: August 16, 2019, 01:56:19 PM »
Its interesting how the jaws were held. Theres no sign of any fasteners. Could the jaws have been placed in the mold then the cast iron poured around them, would it bond. The serration marks run from the jaws into the cast below them, so machining was done with them in place.
I'd bolt new ones in but no idea how to get the remaining one off.

Greg

Carpenter84

Re: Restoring a vise
« Reply #10 on: August 16, 2019, 05:44:26 PM »
.
Shawn

First 9x42 column mill,
Enterprise 10x28 lathe,
Ko Lee 6x12 surface grinder,
Airco dip/stick 160 welder,
Fully stocked wood shop.

woodchucker

Re: Restoring a vise
« Reply #11 on: August 16, 2019, 07:05:17 PM »
so either welded normally, or as Greg says put in the mold , that would be a form of welding.
Jeff
Clausing 8520   SB Model 9a - power hacksaw, Milwaukee band saw in a table.  Delta Rockwell Surface Grinder (not online yet .. being rebuilt where am I going to stick this)
For pics: https://imgur.com/user/woodchucker/posts

Carpenter84

Re: Restoring a vise
« Reply #12 on: August 17, 2019, 12:26:36 AM »
Well, I heated it. And I was able to push it off with a screw driver. Absolutely no idea how it was affixed. Maybe during casting. Who know. But it left the surface very rough. The entire casting isn't very good, to be honest.
Taking the jaw off left the corners broken on the vise. Also explains why the other corners are broken off too. But, I feel the corner I took off was already cracked before me.

I faced off a layer on the base so make it sit flat, then touched up the jaw surfaces, and just did some hand work/flap disc on the surface to tidy up.

The bars of copper I have left from my big copper vise jaws aren't big enough. So I'll grab some more this week.
Once I get some jaws on it I'll paint it. Haven't decided a colour.

It's not a stellar vise, but I think I'll like it for work that requires a bit more care than the big brute 8".

When I was cleaning, I found a marking... I wonder if it means this was made in 1942..
Shawn

First 9x42 column mill,
Enterprise 10x28 lathe,
Ko Lee 6x12 surface grinder,
Airco dip/stick 160 welder,
Fully stocked wood shop.

4GSR

Re: Restoring a vise
« Reply #13 on: August 17, 2019, 09:50:09 AM »
That would be almost impossible to attach by casting in place in the sand mold.  The jaw insert would have to be heated to a somewhat high temperature and Borax powder used as a flux coated to the heated piece.  Then pour the molted metal in the mold, to get it to "glue" to the insert.  Of course, as thin as the jaw insert is, it probably would melt into a glob and loose its cross hatch surface in the process.  I don't see this happening in a closed mold.  Just looking at the picture of the insert, it appears it was silvered soldered to the casting.  This could be easily be done in a furnace, or what they call "furnace brazing"  I've seen this done on parts in my past.   
Ken

Carpenter84

Re: Restoring a vise
« Reply #14 on: August 17, 2019, 11:13:55 AM »
I wondered brass or silver, too. I filed the back of the jaw and the material is quite hard. So, I'm at a loss.
The cross hatch looks like it was formed after. It extended past the insert and on the actual vise cast iron
Shawn

First 9x42 column mill,
Enterprise 10x28 lathe,
Ko Lee 6x12 surface grinder,
Airco dip/stick 160 welder,
Fully stocked wood shop.