Author Topic: Restoring a vise  (Read 421 times)

4GSR

Re: Restoring a vise
« Reply #30 on: August 18, 2019, 09:08:25 AM »
Shawn,

If you would like a scanned section of my book on cast iron welding, let me know and I'll send to you only. It's only about eight pages long. 

As FC350 said, look for the nickel rod that is machinable after welding.  As I said above, look for the ENi-CI destination on the rods.  This rod is machinable after welding according to Lincoln. 
Ken

Terrywerm

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Re: Restoring a vise
« Reply #31 on: August 18, 2019, 10:54:19 AM »
Over the years I've done a number of cast iron welding projects, each with its own set of headaches. The worst one to do turned out with the best results. I used Forney "Super Ni-cast" nickel rod in 3/32" size available at my local hardware store. It comes in a small half pound box of five or ten rods, I don't remember exactly. I believe I used the 55% nickel rods, not the 99%. Both carry the eni-ci designation and are considered machinable. They are VERY expensive with a half pound of the 99% nickel rods in 3/32" size currently priced at $50. The 55% rods are a bit cheaper at $34 for a half pound of the 3/32" rods.

The project was a flywheel for an Onan 20 HP engine. I had to remove the flywheel to replace the ring gear. In the process I accidentally dropped the flywheel and broke off the corner of one of the fan blades. After issuing a number of very select words, I managed to find the piece that broke off and started planning my repair strategy which had to be bulletproof as the flywheel spins at up to 3800 RPM. The attached photo shows a similar flywheel, not mine, but exactly like mine. I penciled in what broke off. I will not go into the details of the repair in this thread, but will provide them in a new thread if there is interest.


Long story short, the repair was successful and that engine still runs today with the flywheel completely intact.

« Last Edit: August 18, 2019, 11:00:55 AM by Terrywerm »
Terry

Making chips with old machines!

4GSR

Re: Restoring a vise
« Reply #32 on: August 18, 2019, 11:15:53 AM »
« Last Edit: August 18, 2019, 11:17:59 AM by 4GSR »
Ken

Carpenter84

Shawn

First 9x42 column mill,
Enterprise 10x28 lathe,
Ko Lee 6x12 surface grinder,
Airco dip/stick 160 welder,
Fully stocked wood shop.

woodchucker

Re: Restoring a vise
« Reply #34 on: August 18, 2019, 12:06:21 PM »
I wouldn't bother with the nickel rods, just braze the corners and voids and screw the jaws on...
much easier. the guy that welded my cross slide (taper ) used non-machineable, and a bead got on the dovetail ... if it were on the gib side no big deal. I could not get the bead off (non-machineable). I wound up having to diamond wheel it off, and touched the dovetail... Not a big deal, but even the carbide dovetail cutter I made did not like the nickel. 


Jeff
Clausing 8520   SB Model 9a - power hacksaw, Milwaukee band saw in a table.  Delta Rockwell Surface Grinder (not online yet .. being rebuilt where am I going to stick this)
For pics: https://imgur.com/user/woodchucker/posts

Carpenter84

Re: Restoring a vise
« Reply #35 on: August 18, 2019, 03:57:18 PM »
What's the trick with the brazing then? What rods? Because I could not get the fluxed brass to stick when I tried the other night...
Shawn

First 9x42 column mill,
Enterprise 10x28 lathe,
Ko Lee 6x12 surface grinder,
Airco dip/stick 160 welder,
Fully stocked wood shop.

Terrywerm

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Re: Restoring a vise
« Reply #36 on: August 18, 2019, 04:29:51 PM »

I haven't brazed cast iron in a long time, but I just used standard brass rod with white flux and never had any issues. You do have to grind or sand down to clean metal first as I am sure you are well aware.


Last CI item that I brazed was an exhaust manifold for a 235 Chevy engine - straight six in a 1959 Viking 40 truck. Yes, it was a long time ago, probably in the late 70's or early 80's.
« Last Edit: August 18, 2019, 04:34:01 PM by Terrywerm »
Terry

Making chips with old machines!

Carpenter84

Re: Restoring a vise
« Reply #37 on: August 18, 2019, 05:14:20 PM »
I'll try again tonight maybe. This time focus a bit more on cleanliness, preheating the surrounding area rather than directly on the weld surface, I'll use my cutting tip for a higher heat without a forceful, violent flame, and see how it goes.

I also have other brazing rods I'll try. The one I used was part of a bundle that was quite old.

I really should get a contactless thermometer again - the laser ones.
I know they're hit and miss, but they generally work alright if the surface isn't glossy and you're not trying to read from 2 feet away... They work best up close.
Shawn

First 9x42 column mill,
Enterprise 10x28 lathe,
Ko Lee 6x12 surface grinder,
Airco dip/stick 160 welder,
Fully stocked wood shop.