Author Topic: Tomatoes in Janury  (Read 118 times)

grumpygator

Tomatoes in Janury
« on: January 15, 2020, 08:20:27 PM »
This time of year I don't like to brag "bout the weather. But in this case, I can't help myself.
 
   It's in the mid 80's here for the last two weeks. I'm still picking 'maters.
        **G** 

     

Carpenter84

Re: Tomatoes in Janury
« Reply #1 on: January 15, 2020, 08:30:06 PM »
That one there is a gorgeous tomato. How's the taste? I'm really critical of bland tasting tomatoes.
Shawn

First 9x42 column mill,
Enterprise 10x28 lathe,
Ko Lee 6x12 surface grinder,
Airco dip/stick 160 welder,
Fully stocked wood shop.

grumpygator

Re: Tomatoes in Janury
« Reply #2 on: January 15, 2020, 09:27:48 PM »
Let's try this again.
   
    **G**

jpigg55

Re: Tomatoes in Janury
« Reply #3 on: January 15, 2020, 09:58:55 PM »
I'll take some !!
I love garden fresh tomatoes, but can't stand the truck ripened, cardboard tasting ones from the store.
SB 9A, Clausing 8520, Sanford MG 612

Jake Parker

Re: Tomatoes in Janury
« Reply #4 on: January 15, 2020, 10:32:11 PM »
Im not pickin maters in East Texas, but I did have to run The AC today in the truck!

savarin

Re: Tomatoes in Janury
« Reply #5 on: January 16, 2020, 05:53:32 AM »
When you grow stuff yourself you wait till its ripe to pick unlike the bland tasteless items in the stores.
Did you see that word thats been forgotten in todays "get it to market now" world?
Yep, thats it "Ripe"
The long distances most produce has to travel means it cannot be picked ripe else it would rot by the time it arrives unfortunately.
I picked this bunch 2 days ago, they look green but were bright yellow in 36 hours.
They have a really unusual taste that I haven't tasted for years, I think its called................ "Banana flavour"  :85: All jokes aside they are so tasty and sweet they only lasted 2 days.
The little black dots are where flying fox claws have pricked them as they checked them out for ripeness.
Cant beat growing your own for taste. :93:


savarin

Re: Tomatoes in Janury
« Reply #6 on: January 16, 2020, 08:25:56 AM »
Hi G, you using wicking beds for those tommies

jpigg55

Re: Tomatoes in Janury
« Reply #7 on: January 16, 2020, 08:26:42 AM »
When you grow stuff yourself you wait till its ripe to pick unlike the bland tasteless items in the stores.
Did you see that word thats been forgotten in todays "get it to market now" world?
Yep, thats it "Ripe"

It goes beyond ripeness these days. Big Ag has sold the farmers a bill of goods with genetic modification.
Most of the seeds and plants we use in our gardens have been modified for harder skins to minimize bruising and damage while shipping and handling and last longer on store shelves all at the expense of texture, flavor, and nutritional value.
SB 9A, Clausing 8520, Sanford MG 612

PJB

Re: Tomatoes in Janury
« Reply #8 on: January 18, 2020, 09:04:19 AM »
Yum Nice.... !AOK  Home grown tomatoes are awesome.  We have neighbors who always plant them and have way more than they can use.  They encourage us to wander over and take whatever we need.  I agree a lot of food you buy these days is horrible quality.  Apples -OMG try finding some that don't suck.  Not just vegtables. Poultry products are downright nasty most places too.  Eggs with yolks that are pale, paper thin shells, Arnold Swartzenager sized chicken breasts with un-natural texture.  It's a function of crappy inputs.  Pekid diets, depleted soil propped up to bare minimum with chemicals.     
I want what yooz gots

savarin

Re: Tomatoes in Janury
« Reply #9 on: January 18, 2020, 08:49:11 PM »
When I first started as a chef in the mid 60's a common dish was a spring chicken.
It was 12 weeks old and served  one per person, about as large as a small mans fist.A 12 week chook today is ancient and huge and tasteless.

grumpygator

Re: Tomatoes in Janury
« Reply #10 on: Today at 09:02:03 AM »
Growing up here in SW Florida in the late 50's early 60's everything on our table was raised, grown, hunted or caught.  My grandparents had a small farm/ranch/orchard. So if we did not have it on our land we would trade for it or go pick it in the wild.  Being so close to the gulf coast seafood was a staple on our table. That being said I still cringe when I see the cost of tasteless produce in the local market. So I try to grow as much as I can.
  I use homemade self-watering containers. Given my location, it is not hard to grow just about anything. Sometimes the hardest part is using the overabundance of a bumper crop. Even the mailman is no longer surprised by a bag full of produce in the box when the crop is good.
            **G**

jpigg55

Re: Tomatoes in Janury
« Reply #11 on: Today at 10:30:44 AM »
Out of curiosity, do you do any canning ??
The wife and I do as much as we are able to. Not as good as garden fresh, but still way better  than the stuff at the market.
SB 9A, Clausing 8520, Sanford MG 612

grumpygator

Re: Tomatoes in Janury
« Reply #12 on: Today at 07:12:02 PM »
Not really. I'm getting better at planting less of some things and trying more new things.  We do a lot of freeze caning. Blanch, peel, and freeze. I just try to spread the wealth.
     **G**

savarin

Re: Tomatoes in Janury
« Reply #13 on: Today at 07:49:15 PM »
Like you "G" I get an overabundance of some crops in the aquaponics system.
It produces a really good feeling giving the excess away to friends.
My biggest "problem" is the kang-kong, its so prolific we have to regularly ask people round to harvest it.
Todays job is build a base for the fish tank in the new house for when I move the complete system.
Not easy in 100 + degrees and high humidity.
This is the hottest its been in the 35 years weve lived here.