Author Topic: Projects.  (Read 4959 times)

4GSR

Re: Projects.
« Reply #135 on: April 14, 2019, 06:51:38 PM »
At least one of the wheels needs to be crowned.  1 to 2 degrees should do it.
Ken

Terrywerm

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Re: Projects.
« Reply #136 on: April 14, 2019, 06:54:30 PM »

Visit this site for a good explanation of crowned pulleys and why this works the way it does.  There is a video there too.


https://woodgears.ca/bandsaw/crowned_pulleys.html
Terry

Making chips with old machines!

f350ca

Re: Projects.
« Reply #137 on: April 14, 2019, 07:04:16 PM »
Read somewhere, might have been an old machinists handbook that only one of the pulleys should be crowned. Crowning them both it said would make the belt wander.

Greg

Carpenter84

Re: Projects.
« Reply #138 on: April 14, 2019, 07:27:23 PM »
I used to deal with a lot of conveyers when I worked in factory. I also deal with a lot of 4-6Ē paper on hundreds of rollers into my winding machine. The first line I ran in the first factory was an old machine, manual everything and flat rollers.
After a couple years they ordered/built a new line, I was able to help them design a few things. I had them crown a bunch of the rollers along the paper route, as the paper often changed direction, etc. It was especially necessary because a lot of the higher grade paper we had to use ran terribly. You could roll out 50í and it would twist up on its own. Pull it flat and it was so wavy you couldnít hold it flat, no way, no how.
I would crown the big aluminum drive roller, and maybe the bottom one. Iíll keep the top one flat for tension and tracking control... maybe I wonít crown the bottom one... since I turned the small rollers straight, it wonít be difficult to get those two to track properly. But the big drive roll, Iím not sure if itís out of align, or the belt is wavy, but it flaps on one side, canít straighten it out.
Either way, the big roll is aluminum, easy to crown. The other two are steel.
Shawn

First 9x42 column mill,
Enterprise 10x28 lathe,
Ko Lee 6x12 surface grinder,
Airco dip/stick 160 welder,
Fully stocked wood shop.

Carpenter84

Re: Projects.
« Reply #139 on: April 16, 2019, 09:31:18 PM »
I crowned the big drive wheel. I have no idea what the angle is, I donít have a compound on my lathe. I turned steps in about 1.5Ē from either side. About .007Ē deep each in 3/8Ē wide steps, then used an air belt sander/filer to smooth out the steps into an even taper. Then emery and scotchbrite smooth. The one wheel wasnít enough. I did the same to the top roller.

Thereís still some wandering, but it was due to tension. I tightened the belt up and it was much better. Each tracking adjustment had much less effect than before. Smoother. However, I have a fine balance between tension and bogging down this motor. I used the dc motor I removed from my lathe for the 3 phase.
The intension with all this was to build the proof of concept before spending any serious money on it. The 2x72Ē machines run about $2100 up here for a basic machine. All the add-ons push the price up past $3000.
So, when I built the platen and frame, I made it very beefy to make sure if this all worked well, it would be worth putting money into it. Rather than finding it all worked but it was too flimsy.

The other issue is Iíve got a bad bearing in that top roller, or, one of the bearings is crooked. Thereís a vibration in the top shaft that turns into a serious noise once you get up to 2000rpm.
Also, when I tapered that top roller, I exposed the seam between the pipe and end cap/plug the bearing is pressed into.

BUT, even with the noise/vibration and unhappy motor, I got it up fast enough to throw some serious sparks cleaning up the steel punch I had been using to push the shafts in and out of the bearings, grind the mushroom off the top, and slow it down to clean up my brass hammer head and wood handle. Lol. Definitely proved the concept though.

So, next steps.
Iím going to remake that top roller, get new bearings all around probably as they were all old bearings. Shitty problem is theyíre all in blind holes...
talk the boss into a 3 phase tefc motor and vfd.
Make the tool platens for both vertical and horizontal positions.
And expand the belt collection.


Shawn

First 9x42 column mill,
Enterprise 10x28 lathe,
Ko Lee 6x12 surface grinder,
Airco dip/stick 160 welder,
Fully stocked wood shop.

Carpenter84

Re: Projects.
« Reply #140 on: May 09, 2019, 09:01:35 PM »
So the belt grinder is nearing completion. Fiiinally. As much as I'd really actually like to keep this, I want it out of my shop. I have no room for another free standing machine.

Tasks remaining.
Mount the control panels.
Mount locking casters,
Make grinding platform for horizontal position. (I'm going to hold off on this for now until I have more time and find out of Marc will actually use it in the horizontal position. )

Things I don't like...
The whole design. But, I built the whole thing as an after thought and learned plenty of what I would do differently.
I wanted him to spend some money on a tefc 3ph motor and VFD as the DC motor installed is totally open (including its permanent magnets...) And it's not powerful enough. It will eventually burn out. I guess we will cross that bridge at a later date.

But, it does run decent. Grinds well. I need to add lock nuts to the tensioning nuts as they loosen.

This was an interesting build.
Shawn

First 9x42 column mill,
Enterprise 10x28 lathe,
Ko Lee 6x12 surface grinder,
Airco dip/stick 160 welder,
Fully stocked wood shop.

GNAP

Re: Projects.
« Reply #141 on: May 10, 2019, 10:35:54 AM »
Looks good, I use my 2x48 belt grinder constantly, probably one of the most used pieces of equipment in the shop.

I had terrible tracking issue, you would set it, start grinding and it was off, reset the track, start to grind and it was off. What finally cured the problem was high quality belts, that had a accurate length on the belt from edge to edge. A crooked belt will not track worth a crap. I ended up using a Carborundum (?) 50 grit ceramic grit belt.
jack

Carpenter84

Re: Projects.
« Reply #142 on: May 10, 2019, 11:18:38 AM »
I purchased 4 belts to test with while building this. The wholesaler purchased from a cheap company and assured me they were a top notch company for a very reasonable price. Yes, the prices were very reasonable.
I didn't like the joints, they were very thick. When you grind it's *thump thump thump thump thump".... I don't care for that.. one of the belts wouldn't track worth a crap. You could see the waviness.
The belts seem to stretch much more than I think they should. And I haven't used the last one yet. I won't be purchasing that brand again. I don't care if they're made locally... That really seems to be the trend with locally made stuff. It's crap... The employees make good money, so the company has to save by using inferior supplies and end up making a junk product...

More often than not these days, I will prefer a chinese made item over a Canadian made one.....

I use klingspore belts on my 5' stroke sander. Zero issues with them. 6"x168" belts. Last a long time, minimal stretch, track well, even under pressure. I did not crown the wheels either. They're pricy tho... With minimum quantities, and having to often order from the states, I'm easily $300 to my door for 6 belts.
Shawn

First 9x42 column mill,
Enterprise 10x28 lathe,
Ko Lee 6x12 surface grinder,
Airco dip/stick 160 welder,
Fully stocked wood shop.

GNAP

Re: Projects.
« Reply #143 on: May 10, 2019, 11:28:41 AM »
Damn!! Thatís $50 a whack, mine are about $3.75/ea, thatís with tax and freight.
jack

woodchucker

Re: Projects.
« Reply #144 on: May 10, 2019, 11:30:16 AM »

I use klingspore belts on my 5' stroke sander. Zero issues with them. 6"x168" belts. Last a long time, minimal stretch, track well, even under pressure. I did not crown the wheels either. They're pricy tho... With minimum quantities, and having to often order from the states, I'm easily $300 to my door for 6 belts.


You have a stroke Sander?  Nice. The guy I buy my tiger maple from has a huge stroke sander... it has to be 10 feet between uprights. Very nice.  The carriage is very large too.  I don't have room for either, but I still have envy.
Jeff
Clausing 8520   SB Model 9a - power hacksaw, Milwaukee band saw in a table.  Delta Rockwell Surface Grinder (not online yet .. being rebuilt where am I going to stick this)
For pics: https://imgur.com/user/woodchucker/posts

Carpenter84

Re: Projects.
« Reply #145 on: May 10, 2019, 08:33:14 PM »
I built this a number of years ago. It's about 5' feet of usable surface space. DC motor with speed control (controller is currently in the garage as I was using it to test to belt grinder before the new kbcc DC controller arrived.
Table can be raised and lowered and of course traverses in and out. Graphite hand pad for back and forth.

When I eventually move into my new shop, I'll be finding a 10 footer. There had been a number of them for sale here in the past for less than $1000.
« Last Edit: May 10, 2019, 08:35:35 PM by Carpenter84 »
Shawn

First 9x42 column mill,
Enterprise 10x28 lathe,
Ko Lee 6x12 surface grinder,
Airco dip/stick 160 welder,
Fully stocked wood shop.

Carpenter84

Re: Projects.
« Reply #146 on: May 10, 2019, 09:19:50 PM »
However, as it turns out now, they're quite a bit more expensive and rare as live edge tables become more popular.
Shawn

First 9x42 column mill,
Enterprise 10x28 lathe,
Ko Lee 6x12 surface grinder,
Airco dip/stick 160 welder,
Fully stocked wood shop.