Author Topic: Projects.  (Read 2659 times)

savarin

Re: Projects.
« Reply #45 on: August 22, 2018, 08:10:55 PM »
Very nice work Shawn, especially liked the tongue and wedge woodwork (if thats the correct term)Thanks for showing

Carpenter84

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Re: Projects.
« Reply #46 on: August 22, 2018, 09:39:00 PM »
No idea what it's called. Haha.
Thanks.
Shawn

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34_40

Re: Projects.
« Reply #47 on: August 23, 2018, 08:20:22 AM »
I believe it's called a tenon,  with a wedge to pin it.
Clausing 108, Clausing 8520, Atlas Horizontal, Lincoln stick and mig welders

Carpenter84

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Re: Projects.
« Reply #48 on: January 25, 2019, 11:26:54 AM »
So, I haven't added to this thread in a while. Been just trudging through work since. Some big projects, some small. Lots of challenges.
But...
We're back at the Hillcroft house - the house a couple pages back where we tore off layer after layer or rotten siding, restructured the roof, poured new foundations for exterior walls, new garage, new deck, etc... They called us back for a new bathroom. A seemingly simple job, $12,000. Custom shower, 36"x24" wall tiles, and fix up some cabinetry from a previous "handyman"... Marc and I have been trying to make a transition into me doing a lot more project management for the company and making big decisions without having to stop, track him down, basically to ask to spend more money to fix whatever I found. The last basement we did went several weeks over and cost nearly 10,000 extra due to problems and challenges. A lot of time was spent with me analyzing, problem solving, banging my head off the wall trying to come with a decision that is most economical. My problem is always worrying about spending too much money. Trying to work with what exists rather than just tearing it out and starting over. Which is most cases is faster and cheaper. Usually once marc came to the site he would just suggest the latter option. But changing my way of approaching problem solving is difficult. My previous jobs have always been do as little work as possible and for the cheapest and just achieve what we're there to do. Hard to change old dogs...
I digress...

This this house is old. Built by some poor dude sometime in the 50's with lumber from crates and skids obtained by a local (no longer exists) rail station/small air port. He did his best... Then 70 years worth of shoddy upgrading... This house has been one can of worms after another...
But we didn't suspect major issues. I suspected a few challenges that would have been easily manageable and I would just make snap decisions without spending a lot of time dwelling on what to do. Been working perfectly fine until this morning...

I had to make the call... "You better get here..."

So we have two bathrooms in this house. One on top of the other. The house has at least one addition. Multiple basement floor heights. Old original low ceilingz likely dirt floor. Then newer proper height addition. The basement bathroom is up on a raised pad due to the old cast iron drains being too high. Instead of doing an ejector pump or toilet pump, they raised the floor... Fine.
What's not fine was in order to get manageable ceiling height, (6') they knotched all the floor joists.. then added sistered joists to make up for many many cut original joists... Long story short, the whole room is sitting on 2x4" joists... NOT allowed under any circumstances...
Our $12,000 bathroom redo just turned into a minimum $30,000 two bathroom gut, crush out concrete floor, redo plumbing drains, fix huge structural issues, new concrete floor, probably bench and under pin, nightmare... I feel so bad for these two, wonderful folks. They bought such a lemon... One thing after another...
We should have just tore the house down and built another...
I'm so glad they have some money squirreled away. My heart would break if this was a younger family with no money rather than semi retired successful people... Uhhg.
Shawn

First 9x42 column mill,
Enterprise 10x28 lathe,
Ko Lee 6x12 surface grinder,
Airco dip/stick 160 welder,
Fully stocked wood shop.

Carpenter84

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Re: Projects.
« Reply #49 on: January 28, 2019, 09:45:21 PM »
the saga continues...

coming back after the weekend, i had some time to mull this bathroom around in my head. think about how i want to tackle things. mainly how to tie in new structure and how.
but for now, started with cleaning up the joist cavity so we could start removing everything. theres a lot going on in the joist cavities... radiant heat pipes, old capped off abs drains, really crummy electrical, all the reflective crap for the radiant heat, copper to pex back to copper water lines.
cleaned everything out, then started dropping the ceiling in the bathroom below. then started taking joists out. which was far easier than expected.
once we had the joists out, our attention turned to how to tie back in. Marc (boss) and i, after a long talk and a lot of investigating of the old structure, decided a new LVL beam would be the best way to build the new floor. the new joists would be sitting on the exterior block wall on one side and hangered off our new lvl beam on the other. so, we started investigating how and where we would put a post to hold up the one side of this new lvl. the other side would be on another exterior block wall...
this led us to questioning the raised floors in the basement. how were they constructed, are they poured concrete, how thick, whats under, etc.
so, lots of demo. took out the steps to the bathroom and the adjacent storage area in the basement. discovered both raised areas are formed and poured concrete. about 4" thick, sitting on dirt... also discovered the entire lower floor is also sitting on dirt... they constructed a 2x4 wall, laid it on the dirt, and plywooded on top......... the lumber is just sitting on the dirt.... sitting on the god damned dirt....
half of the 2x4 platform floor is completely rotten. how this entire house is not completely infested with termites i have no idea... now, i dont even know whats going to happen with the entire rest of the basement.. on the lower floor there is a landing, office, bedroom, and three closets... quite a bit of square footage potentially just sitting on dirt. completely deplorable...
anyways, were ignoring that for now. we have to press on with the post and beam.

the plan for now is to break open the side wall of the raised concrete floor, undermine the corner, form and pour a footing, then break open the top of the slab and install the post, then we can put the beam up and get a floor in the upper bathroom.

because this house falls apart each time we work on it, we have to complete the upper bathroom in two weeks, then move onto another job of smashing concrete and pouring new footings so we can move around some steel posts for a steel beam in a basement we're starting. $100,000 basement job. big house. all engineered drawings. have to call a welder in to weld the new posts and a 4x4 x 1/4" steel box tube under the existing beam so we can move the posts out of the way. then i will be able to go back and continue working on this debacle at hillcroft...







i honestly cannot imagine the thought process of the people who do this kind of work. or how they go home and sleep at night...
the shear amount of work that went into forming and pouring these raised slabs, instead of just modifying the plumbing drains is incomprehensible. the house was built back sometime in the 20's i think. cast iron drains to the street, and low basements. so the drains are quite high. much too high to put a functioning bathroom..... they raised the bathroom floor to the height of the cast drains. and in the process realized they didnt have adequate headroom, so they notched out the floor joists above to give more headroom. all the meanwhile, completely ruining this house.... guh...
« Last Edit: January 28, 2019, 09:48:01 PM by Carpenter84 »
Shawn

First 9x42 column mill,
Enterprise 10x28 lathe,
Ko Lee 6x12 surface grinder,
Airco dip/stick 160 welder,
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Terrywerm

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Re: Projects.
« Reply #50 on: January 28, 2019, 11:05:48 PM »

Ho-ly Mo-ly!!!    I'm not a carpenter by any stretch of the imagination, but even I know better than to do what they did.


I honestly don't know what else to say, and that's saying something by itself. Lord knows I've got something to say about just about anything you can think of! I sure am glad that I don't own it!!!



Terry

Making chips with old machines!

4GSR

Re: Projects.
« Reply #51 on: January 29, 2019, 08:46:30 AM »
What a mess!

Reminds me of the old family homestead. Down stairs bathroom, tad smaller than this one, we had to raise the floor about a foot to reroute the plumbing.  Where dad screw up on the measurements of the sewer lines under the slab, off by exactly 10".  Tried to tell him, the i wonder where I get my hard headiness from. :-[
Ken

Carpenter84

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Re: Projects.
« Reply #52 on: January 29, 2019, 12:09:35 PM »
The footing.

Meet Scotty. Concrete extraordinaire.
Shawn

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Ko Lee 6x12 surface grinder,
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Carpenter84

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Re: Projects.
« Reply #53 on: January 31, 2019, 04:01:48 PM »
This is what I've been buried in for the past 3 days.
That upper panel was the original and it was a goonfest... Way over loaded. Double tapped breakers. Total ratsnest.
It started with me having to pull a dozen wires to move out of the way of our new beam for the bathroom. And ended with me rewiring most of the house. 27 junction boxes, 14 removed/dead end/redundant circuits removed, buried devices behind drywall, open air connections, and I don't know how many switches and plugs I fixed. Homeowners are exceedingly happy I fixed as much as I did. I also put a bunch of pot lights in to replace some really crummy, tired, dome lights.

Meanwhile, the guys have been restructuring the bathroom, and the plumbers were in. Finished the rough-ins.
Maybe tomorrow I can actually get back to building a bathroom.
Shawn

First 9x42 column mill,
Enterprise 10x28 lathe,
Ko Lee 6x12 surface grinder,
Airco dip/stick 160 welder,
Fully stocked wood shop.

4GSR

Re: Projects.
« Reply #54 on: January 31, 2019, 04:50:39 PM »
When did they start turning breaker boxes sideways?
Ken

Carpenter84

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Re: Projects.
« Reply #55 on: January 31, 2019, 05:37:54 PM »
Orientation doesnt matter. Sideways, upside down, crooked. Whatever you want. As long as the height to the top of the highest breaker is not over a certain height. Can't remember how high right now. 1.4 meters or something... always just used my chin height.
If anything, I may get dinged for being too low. But space was at a premium, so inspector likely wouldn't say much... If we were getting this inspected... Which were not...
Shawn

First 9x42 column mill,
Enterprise 10x28 lathe,
Ko Lee 6x12 surface grinder,
Airco dip/stick 160 welder,
Fully stocked wood shop.

Carpenter84

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Re: Projects.
« Reply #56 on: January 31, 2019, 05:39:54 PM »
When I was doing new construction, due to the way the pipe came into the basement, my panels were upside down almost 95% of the time.
Shawn

First 9x42 column mill,
Enterprise 10x28 lathe,
Ko Lee 6x12 surface grinder,
Airco dip/stick 160 welder,
Fully stocked wood shop.

Carpenter84

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Re: Projects.
« Reply #57 on: February 07, 2019, 02:14:09 PM »
Moving right along.

Back to my bread a butter... reluctantly...
Shawn

First 9x42 column mill,
Enterprise 10x28 lathe,
Ko Lee 6x12 surface grinder,
Airco dip/stick 160 welder,
Fully stocked wood shop.

Carpenter84

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Re: Projects.
« Reply #58 on: February 13, 2019, 12:54:40 PM »
"the pucker factor is strong in the one..."



3'x5' porcelain tiles. Only 3/16" thick compared to the 3/8" thick floor tiles. To keep the weight down. Huuuuge tiles. A third one will go against the faucet wall tomorrow. Need to get my diamond hole saws.
Shawn

First 9x42 column mill,
Enterprise 10x28 lathe,
Ko Lee 6x12 surface grinder,
Airco dip/stick 160 welder,
Fully stocked wood shop.

woodchucker

Re: Projects.
« Reply #59 on: February 13, 2019, 01:08:46 PM »
"the pucker factor is strong in the one..."



3'x5' porcelain tiles. Only 3/16" thick compared to the 3/8" thick floor tiles. To keep the weight down. Huuuuge tiles. A third one will go against the faucet wall tomorrow. Need to get my diamond hole saws.
nice... lots of kerdi there. Do I need a vapor barrier behind the kerdi and hardi board ... or is the kerdi a good enough vapor barrier?
I am so confused on vapor barrier lately. reading some of the fine home building.. they are saying it is causing rot in the lumber because of how tight the homes are now.. HOME DEPOT only had unfaced the last two times I went... so starting to wonder.
Jeff
Clausing 8520   SB Model 9a - power hacksaw, Milwaukee band saw in a table.  Delta Rockwell Surface Grinder (not online yet .. being rebuilt where am I going to stick this)
For pics: https://woodchucker.imgur.com